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Mo Abudu, CEO of Ebonylife has dealt with allegations of copyright infringement by one Tobore Ovourie, over the film ‘Oloture’.

Tobore Ovuorie had sometime last week accused Mo Abudu and the film’s producers of altering its 2014 investigation report without her explicit consent.

Abudu, taking her side of the story on Instagram, said EbonyLife paid Premium times for the film and gave Tobore 5% off cinema money for her contribution as a writer.

However, she warned that her representation will not address potential threats from Tobore to the media despite the earlier agreement.

She said: “Premium times have said that they cannot claim the project, only Sam chronicles can take the copyright of the report, we will not be so kind to those who say otherwise.

“We should not make a film without dealing with rights and paying for them.

“In May 2019, we reached out to Tobore and gave her a private screening and offered 5% of our cinema rights to go to her NGO. ‘Oloture’ was an important movie but because of COVID-19 we couldn’t release it.

“A day after Oloture was released on Netflix in October 2020, Tobore sent us a message and made allegations of intimidation and intimidation.”

However, Mo Abudu explained that before the film was released, she had a friendly relationship with Tobore and even sent her some money for her father ‘s funeral and so on.

She confirmed that her relationship with Tobore changed abruptly after the release of Oloture and its success on Netflix.

Abudu said Tobore immediately switched to it, hired a lawyer and demanded a N2.5bn payment that has gone down so far.

“A month after the launch of Oloture we received a letter from her solicitor requesting a total of N2.5bn which is not what we added.

“We knew we hadn’t infringed her rights and we decided that all before the film. Her demands have become threatening, black-on-black.

“My relationship with Tobore changed immediately after the growing popularity of Oloture on Netflix.

“I’ll tell you for the album ‘Oloture’ is a story inspired by real events involving situations created by scriptwriters, several parts of the films were created but some parts like Tobore ‘s life and that is why she was given credits and at times precious, She said.

Mo Abudu urged the public to educate themselves about how the film industry works before they become critical.

“Tobore’s experience is what most women get because of human trafficking around the world. I stand for integrity, we did not betray Tobore and we would not be intimidated but fight in court if necessary, ”she concluded.

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