‘The Golden Girls’: Estelle Getty Once Said This Was The ‘Most Important Cause’ She Cared About

The Golden Girls one of the most loved sitcoms ever, thanks in part to the star-studded characters. Betty White, Rue McClanahan, Bea Arthur, and Estelle Getty each brought something different to the table. And despite being a well-known TV show for his comedy, The Golden Girls it was not like denying hot matters.

The team of 'The Golden Girls': Estelle Getty, Rue McClanahan, Bea Arthur, and Betty White
The team of ‘The Golden Girls’: Estelle Getty, Rue McClanahan, Bea Arthur, and Betty White | Walt Disney Television via Getty Images Walt Disney Photo Archives / Television via Getty Images

‘The Golden Girls’ often dealt with important issues and issues

The Golden Girls better known for the wisdoms from characters like Arthur’s Dorothy and Sophty at Getty than it is for the social narrative. But there were many occasions during the run – in addition to his various versions – where the show reported on a particular case.

In one episode, young guest Mario Lopez appears as Dorothy’s star student whom they discover is an undocumented immigrant and an exporter. In a program of the spin-off The Golden Palace, Blanche Devereaux learns about the painful reality of the Confederate flag and decides not to honor the flag or its history again.

Estelle Getty as Sophia Petrillo |  Herb Ball / NBCU Photo Bank
Estelle Getty as Sophia Petrillo | Herb Ball / NBCU Photo Bank

Estelle Getty was very different from her character Sophia

Even though Sophia is famously in bloom, the actress behind the character was a lot more sensible when it came to choosing her words. There were a lot of subjects that Getty didn’t feel should be turned into a joke on display, and she was notorious for not letting her character Sophia go from being bittersweet to just mean.

Getty talked about her situation in interview in 1992 and she proved that there are things she did not want Sophia to say. “I have something about pain relief,” she said honestly. “I have something about using humor that hurts so much. ”

She went on to explain why she didn’t think it was funny to mock things that were common punchlines at the time. “Why should I make fun of someone who is obese, or cross-eyed, or bald? ”She said openly.

Estelle Getty with an Emmy Award staged at the 40th Primetime Emmy Awards on August 28, 1988 at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California |  Craig Sjodin / Walt Disney Television via Getty Images
Estelle Getty with an Emmy Award staged at the 40th Primetime Emmy Awards on August 28, 1988 at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena, California | Craig Sjodin / Walt Disney Television via Getty Images

Estelle Getty was very friendly for one important reason during the ‘Golden Girls’

Getty was also a questionable advocate for the LGBTQ community at a time when there were few celebrities. As a result, she said she won’t be “making gay-bashing jokes,” especially since the AIDS pandemic is in the running of the show.

She spoke about her relationship with the gay community in a 1989 interview with The Applicant. “I am very grateful to the gay community,” she said. “They put me where I am today. They found me, and they stood by me, and they have been very loyal. ”

“I’ve been in the show business all my life, and most of my friends are gay. I do not deny that, ”she told the Ludington Daily News the same year. She said that “a lot of [her] friends have died of AIDS. ”

Getty attended various AIDS memorabilia and events throughout the ’80s as Golden Girls was on the air. She had even been honored at the Los Angeles AIDS Project1987 White Party, and he was excited to be there. “I’m here because I’m here for no good reason, and AIDS is my most important cause right now,” Getty said with a laugh.

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